What Makes Something Perfect? – One of Many Personal Predicaments

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Someone I follow on Twitter recently insinuated that a 10/10 game should not exist. He elaborated on this claim somewhat by stating that “absolute zero” is the extreme polar opposite of a 10/10, perhaps perceiving the label as one only reserved for games with no flaws whatsoever (which is, as implied, impossible). This mindset is one that I feel is more on the pragmatic alignment of criticism, which finds more value in the “objective” rather than the “feeling,” where one cannot help but never see anything as a 10/10 because that would imply it is perfect, an accolade impossible to achieve. (more…)

What It Means to Be “Tryhard” in Anime (Or Fiction in General)

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[This post was inspired by Karandi of 100wordanime’s “Why We Need to Stop Mocking Stories for Trying” post.]

If one was to search “tryhard” with my blog’s search box on the front page, they would find eight articles within the past two-ish years in which I used the word in a post. To be honest, I’m surprised there hasn’t been more cases of it, as it’s something I tend to say quite often (perhaps only in my head?). Of course, people can simply say things and assume people know what they mean by it, but I decided to take the road I paved without taking safety checks and am finally getting to those safety checks—to ensure that everyone is aware of what I’m talking about when I use the term as a form of negative criticism. (more…)

Wholesome Versus Profound – One of Many Personal Predicaments

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I may just turn this into a series of posts to come out periodically; a collection of things that I find within indulging in visual media that have become popular think pieces for me over the years. This post’s topic is something that plagues me—and likely many others—on a regular basis. (more…)

Self-Indulgent Writing in Anime: Why I Hate It and Why You Probably Don’t

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As an experienced anime viewer with a penchant for dissecting the “goods” and the “bads” of any particular series, I’ve developed a sense of what I typically value in a fictional (or nonfictional) story. Though trying to pinpoint every little detail about what makes one topic of entertainment good or bad in an Aristotle-like manner is a near-impossible task in this day and age, I try to do my best to elaborate on why I find particular aspects of a story valuable or otherwise. In recent years—though its mark can be found in earlier decades—series have begun to hop onto the popular trend of something I’ve come to call “Self-indulgent writing,” which I will explain in more detail as the post continues. This passage will serve as the basis for what I’m referring to by this phrasing, should it ever come up in future articles (and I’m sure it will), as well as my thoughts on why this negative criticism of the topic may just be my desire to be a hipster. (more…)

The Art of Anime Pretentiousness

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Welcome to the anime community. Your opinions are garbage. Why? Allow me to fill out four or five paragraphs of why that is, but first I will explain to you exactly what it means to be a “casual.” First of all,

a. person who is not nuanced within the proper context of Japanese folklore
b. only enjoys shows on a surface level, disallowing selection of art forms that present a greater conflict of sociological or psychological proportions to flourish
b. i. person does so because they are not intelligently capable enough to comprehend or too lazy to care for enlightenment
c. (addendum – 17/07/05; 13:31 P.M.) roped into anime by casual-istic titles such as Boku no Hero Academia or Dungeon ni Deai wo Motomeru no wa Machigatteiru Darou ka, distilling the expectations of the medium into surface-level appeal
d. believes the medium should cater to their whims (lmao)

Get the gist? Good. Let’s talk pretentiousness in anime. (more…)

Does Metroid Fusion Need a Remake?

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In September of last year, Metroid: Samus Returns was released to the glee of Metroid fans everywhere. A remake of a game not prevalent in the minds of even diehard fans, the original Metroid II for the Game Boy is, from what I can gather, not a great game, regardless. Part of the reason for this, however, is that they tried to fit a Metroid-esque style of game, dedicated to atmosphere, (to some extent) cinematics, and fast-paced action, on an early-days handheld system that was neither powerful nor pretty. To remake this game in a day and age where handheld games are much more grandiose than they were twenty years ago, I was all for it. Convenient enough that it released a year after the infamous AM2R fan game hit the internet, but that only served to further my excitement in comparing the two games when Samus Returns inevitably landed in my lap. (more…)