Top 10 Favorite Pokémon (2020 Redux)

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For a long while, I found myself doubting my capacity to enjoy Pokémon in a modern setting. Hand-holding aplenty, huge emphasis on EPIC legendary encounters and storylines, and the constant attempts at gripping nostalgia for maximum profit has made me wary of the current direction of the franchise. Even so, after playing Shield for myself, I had a good time, and have even come to terms with thinking it better than games prior (a controversial opinion I may expand on at a later date). I still adore the franchise and how it helped shape my gaming youth, and with a resurgent vitality, I began to ponder that list I made in 2016. It could use a bit of a touch-up. Continue reading “Top 10 Favorite Pokémon (2020 Redux)”

Old Games Are Fast, New Games Are Slow | One of Many Personal Predicaments

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It’s been some time since I’ve done one of these “personal predicament” posts. Typically, these are things that I experience in my day-to-day life revolving things that interest me, that which confounds me or seem interesting enough to think upon. The “art” of critique and critical thinking is something that floods my mind often, and recently, Animal Crossing has been the primary subject. This will not be a full-on review of New Horizons (though I do have one), nor will it be a dissertation on why the original game is so much better. This will cover something I’ve felt a common occurrence in games from then and now, which has affected the way I approach and appreciate titles: speed.

No, Sonic the Hedgehog will not be mentioned here (though it could). Continue reading “Old Games Are Fast, New Games Are Slow | One of Many Personal Predicaments”

Fire Emblem: Awakening, Pokémon LeafGreen, and the Unfortunate Consequence of Playing Better Games

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In major parts of November and December, I played through and thoroughly enjoyed Pokémon Platinum, which was particularly surprising considering I didn’t think I liked the fourth generation of Pokémon. Upon its release roughly seven months ago, Fire Emblem: Three Houses destroyed my social life and ended up being my 2019 GOTY. Both would have a profound impact on my experience playing games from their respective franchises that came before: Fire Emblem: Awakening and Pokémon LeafGreen, both of which I had previously completed and enjoyed. Said impact, unfortunately, did not end up positive. Continue reading “Fire Emblem: Awakening, Pokémon LeafGreen, and the Unfortunate Consequence of Playing Better Games”

The Wild Area Saved Pokémon Sword & Shield From Mediocrity

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If regular readers are taking this in and thinking to themselves, “Hey, this isn’t Merry Days of Anime,” know that I’m currently watching through a two-cour anime, so the next post may take a while (unless I drop it). The topic for today is something I’ve been pondering for a little while, at least in the time since I beat Pokémon Shield, a game I at one point claimed I wouldn’t play. Continue reading “The Wild Area Saved Pokémon Sword & Shield From Mediocrity”

Sorry, OG Fans: Game Freak Will (Likely) Never Make Another Pokémon Game Tailored For You

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I could start this piece about Pokémon‘s historic and surprising rise to worldwide phenomenon, but I bet you’ve heard that told ’round the campfire a few times. Instead, I want to talk about something else entirely. Continue reading “Sorry, OG Fans: Game Freak Will (Likely) Never Make Another Pokémon Game Tailored For You”

Expecting a National Dex With Pokémons Sword & Shield is Insane

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People are crying. They were once overjoyed, blissful of the state of the upcoming Pokémon games, which would grace the Nintendo Switch for the first time in the series’s (mainline) history. Their expectations and hopes were shattered upon the announcement that they wouldn’t be able to transfer all of their pokémon from the upcoming Pokémon Home into Sword & Shield. The reason? The Galar region will not support a national dex, code for “Only a fraction of the total number of pokémon will be available in Sword & Shield.”

The outcry has been substantial. Thousands of Pokémon fans are swearing off their loyalty from the company and the upcoming game. The hashtag “#BringBackNationalDex” has become a symbol of their contempt, a unifying plea for the Pokémon Company to answer. Fans are now hostile, suspicious, and cynical of every detail on the once-beloved upcoming titles. They wish for every pokémon, not just “some.” After all, it’s about catching them all.

What a time to be a Pokémon fan. Continue reading “Expecting a National Dex With Pokémons Sword & Shield is Insane”

Thoughts on the June 5th Pokémon Sword & Shield Direct

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I have been pretty vocal about my dismay with the current direction of Pokémon. Ever since X & Y, I have gradually (but ultimately) lost the armor of passion that the franchise once gave me. The company seemed dead-set on flair and bravado with no substance. Mega evolutions and legendaries and saving the world from unspeakable evil… oh my, was it tiring and boring.

Upon the announcement of a 15-minute Direct showcasing new info on Sword & Shield, I had low expectations. I expected the chain to continue and for the series to be more about “TEH EPICZZ!¡!!” than going around and simply indulging in the simple pleasures of catching and battling. It was inevitable.

So what the hell happened? I’m actually excited for the new games. Continue reading “Thoughts on the June 5th Pokémon Sword & Shield Direct”

Top 10 Least Favorite Pokémon

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Ah, memories. I remember quite fondly the days when I would spend hours everyday on Pokémon Ruby in my youth. Even Pokémon games that I would eventually come to find quite uneven (fourth gen and onward) provide a warm feeling of nostalgia when I peek at gameplay footage anywhere around the internet. A few years ago for my blog’s three-year anniversary, I looked at my favorite Pokémon ever (which is slightly outdated; for example, Dunsparce is now my favorite Pokémon). Today, we will strike the balance between light and dark by looking at my least favorite pokémon ever… but not before a few disclaimers. Continue reading “Top 10 Least Favorite Pokémon”

Pokémon: The Origin Review

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(Originally posted October 5th, 2013 on MyAnimeList. Minimally edited.)

It’s important to remember that when reviewing any topic, one should keep their personal bias to a very low minimum. This is especially difficult when dealing with a monster type franchise such as the Pokémon series, as most—if not all—people have been exposed to either the Pokémon series or games at some point in their lives. To the degree that this affects their opinion of the franchise is what ultimately will decide the fate of the future of the series. Keeping this point in mind, when it was announced that a new anime would be produced that would follow the storyline of the original Pokémon games, it was safe to say that a few people were excited. They were promised a look back at what revolutionized a franchise in the form of a four-episode special. What it was willing to accomplish in those four episodes is the most debatable topic of all.

Once again, when reviewing, one is recommended that they put their personal bias to a very low minimum. Keeping this in mind, I viewed this four-episode special through the mind of someone who has no prior knowledge of the Pokémon series or games. I watched Pokémon: The Origin as if I was playing the first game for the first time through the perspective of the main character. From what was gathered, the story begins with a character named Red, who is passionate about catching and training creatures known as Pokémon. He, along with his rival, Green, is tasked with collecting every species of Pokémon known to that world by the town’s local Pokémon professor: Professor Oak. With his goal set in stone, Red sets out to catch ’em all.

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With only four episodes to work with, there is a guarantee that not everything from the game will be shown in the series. To someone who has no prior knowledge of the game, these time skips do more justice as a form of confusion than anything else. Along with this, the special only chooses to show certain scenes from the game, with some scenes being obvious to the hardcore fan, while random to about everyone else. Due to this, each episode not completely focused on the goal of collecting every pokémon possible or advancing that plot accordingly is viewed more as a filler episode. To those not aware of the Pokémon games, they will also notice a variety of plotholes within the special that don’t make sense unless you’ve played the game. One such thing is the absence of police or the logic behind sending a child out to collect potentially dangerous creatures in order to satisfy the wish of a man no one knows anything about. Without these security blankets, viewers won’t know how to interpret the impact of certain scenes and their importance to the series. These gaping plotholes and the lack of any character development is prevalent and noticeable throughout the entirety of this special.

Speaking of character development, it wouldn’t seem too far fetched to think that the special would focus a little time on developing the main character, Red, as he’s on screen roughly 85% of the time, whether in recaps or otherwise. With the entire series being based on this one character, it’s hard to really enjoy any other character that’s introduced during the time span, that is, unless you’re a fan of the series. I’m sensing a pattern here. The only other character that gets any amount of focus in more than one episode is Green, and even he doesn’t develop into anything more than the rival character. The issue with the lack of depth can be solely attributed to the lack of time and the length of the individual pokémon battles. Whether in recaps or actual battle, Red is shown fighting other characters’ pokémon a big chunk of the time that this special has to offer. It does take the liberty to offer some insight on how Red develops as a trainer through his struggles with certain opponents, and the views he shares when facing someone with far different beliefs. Unfortunately, this is the most that the special is willing to offer.

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What would be an appropriate way to animate a series trying to showcase nostalgic elements? Why, with save screens and in-game text, of course. At the beginning and end of each episode, the viewer is shown a small snippet of animation that plays to the feelings of those who played the original games. Before each episode, one has to load up the save file in order to continue their adventure, and when they’re finished, they have to save their progress. These in-game pop-ups serve as a reminder of how important it is to save the game, what it matters to the quality of the animation is not exceedingly accurate. The recaps that I’ve mentioned before are also reminiscent of the original games as a small text box will appear at the bottom of the screen, explaining the situation that is being spoken of to us by Red. In terms of the animation in general, it’s appropriate, to say the least. It’s not the most spectacular animation one will see from animators of the 21st century, but it’s enough to satisfy both fans and newcomers alike. The battles are vivid and well-detailed, granted the viewer isn’t stricken with how dull the humans look in comparison to the pokémon. Such is only expected from those who know the series.

Taking everything into consideration, if one is a fan of the Pokémon series, this special will probably hold a special place in their heart. It’s respectful to its source material (until the end) and the character Ash Ketchum, who plays the main role of the original Pokémon series, is nowhere in sight. Seeing as I am a fan of the Pokémon series of games, it was enjoyable to view from a fan’s perspective, but that doesn’t erase the numerous problems that are hidden behind the spontaneous animation. Some of these problems are excusable due to the time restraints that a series has with only four episodes, but there have been series that have done more with less, and to excuse something as enormous as Pokémon from doing anything less than possible puts it in hot water with those unfamiliar with the series. Everything else considered, this is the perfect treat for fans of the original games, but its purely restricted to that group in particular.

The rating for this title and all others can be found on MyAnimeList.